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Created and Sold by Lynne Meade

Lynne Meade
Hourglass Openwork Table | Tables by Lynne Meade
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Customize this piece
Image credit: Karen and Richard Herzog
Hourglass Openwork Table | Tables by Lynne Meade
Hourglass Openwork Table | Tables by Lynne Meade

Hourglass Openwork Table

Price $3,200

Creation: 4-6 weeks
Shipping: 3-7 days
Price $120 Shipping in the US, ask the creator about international shipping.
Estimated Arrival: January 23, 2023

DimensionsWeight
30H x 24W x 30D in70 lb

Wheel thrown, hand pierces white stoneware Side Table.

Inspired by mid-century modern design, the pierced collection is wheel thrown and hand pierced stoneware with a satin glaze. Small holes are created when the clay is still wet and then each hole is painstakingly enlarged and smoothed when the clay is bone dry. The interplay of light and shadow, color and form complements any urban, contemporary or transitional space

• Dimensions: 21" height x 17" diameter
• Color: White Satin
• Material: White Stoneware
• Shape: Hourglass
• Pattern: Openwork
• Designed and handcrafted in Oakland, CA.

Top is removable for cleaning

Pieces can be customized to your size specifications. Custom colors are available. Pricing varies accordingly.

Returns accepted within 14 days See details
Trade Members enjoy Free returns within 30 days regardless of the Creator's return policy. Learn more

Item Hourglass Openwork Table
Created by Lynne Meade
As seen in Private Residence, Palo Alto, CA
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Lynne Meade
Meet the Creator
Wescover creator since 2020
Wheel thrown, hand pierced pottery

All of my pieces are wheel thrown and hand pierced. Everything is done by eye, without molds or templates. I initially pierce the piece about two hours after I throw it. I pierce it while it is still fairly wet so that it won’t crack. But the holes are much smaller at this point, so that the piece won’t collapse. I then go back when the piece is completely dry and the clay is rigid, and painstakingly enlarge each hole with a damp sponge. The water in the sponge erodes away the bone dry clay, allowing me to take away as much clay as possible
I love to push the medium as far as I can, seeing how little clay I can leave while still maintaining the structural integrity of the piece. People often ask me why they don’t collapse and I tell them that they often do. Most of the time the problems happen during the hottest part of the firing process. The clay becomes slightly molten and the more lacy pieces can slump or collapse. It is a careful balance between achieving the delicate appearance that I want and not creating a kiln disaster.
I also strive to blur the boundaries between form and function, and function and art. I was trained as a traditional, functional potter. I will probably always want to create tableware and functional pieces, but also can’t seem to resist rebelling against function, and the constraints and limitations of functional ware, just to see how far I can take the clay. It’s all about strength in the form of delicacy