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Blue Kolam # 9 | Oil And Acrylic Painting in Paintings by Paz de la Calzada | 1890 Bryant Street Studios in San Francisco. Item made of canvas
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Blue Kolam # 9 | Oil And Acrylic Painting in Paintings by Paz de la Calzada | 1890 Bryant Street Studios in San Francisco. Item made of canvas
Blue Kolam # 9 | Oil And Acrylic Painting in Paintings by Paz de la Calzada | 1890 Bryant Street Studios in San Francisco. Item made of canvas
Blue Kolam # 9 | Oil And Acrylic Painting in Paintings by Paz de la Calzada | 1890 Bryant Street Studios in San Francisco. Item made of canvas

Created and Sold by Paz de la Calzada

Paz de la Calzada

Blue Kolam # 9 - Paintings

Featured In 1890 Bryant Street Studios, San Francisco, CA

Price $5,500

Earn 5% credit ($275 in Member rewards) upon purchase

Creation: 2-3 weeks
Shipping: 5-10 days
Price $500 Shipping in the US, ask the creator about international shipping.
Estimated Arrival: January 9, 2024

Handmade

Woman Owned

Recycled Materials

Made In USA

Natural Materials

Locally Sourced

DimensionsWeight
48H x 64W x 0.5D in
121.92H x 162.56W x 1.27D cm
6.35 kg
14 lb

Acrylic and pigments on Canvas
Series inspired in the 4 elements: Water

The word Kolam in South India refers to the mandala-like drawings that women in India make for certain holidays to bring blessings to their homes.

One of the most revealing parts about my trip to India was discovering the role that women have in the development of the cultural/spiritual/craft legacy. The same as in old generations of women in my own country, Spain, women are the ones weaving, knitting or stitching. In India they also use white lines made with chalk, rice paste or rice flour to "knit or write" in the floor of a street or the outside walls of their house. In fact the word knitting/weaving - creating a textile, in Spanish “tejer” - have the same origin as the word text - “texere” in latin.

It makes sense and makes me think how these women use artistic lines not only to intervene the public space and playfully affect the way we experience the architecture of their homes but as a way for self -expression that in some cases makes more sense than using words.

Lines, geometric patters and intricate forms are a big part of my work. Seeing these fierce women working with lines and creating "texts" makes me reflect about my own fascination and almost obsession with making likes and creating all these intricate paths either to be walked or contemplated.

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Paz de la Calzada
Meet the Creator
Wescover creator since 2020
Paintings, Site-specific Drawings and Murals

"Paz de la Calzada, a native of Spain, is an artist working in drawing, installation and sculpture. She received a BFA at the University of Salamanca, Spain, and her MFA at UNAM, Mexico City.

Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including the San Jose Museum of Art, the Palo Alto Art Center, the Berkeley Art Center, the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts in San Francisco, the Union Fenosa Museum and the Fundacion Caixa Galicia in Spain and the Leon Trotsky Museum and the San Angel Cultural Center in Mexico City.

Paz came to the San Francisco Bay Area in 2003 as an Artist in Residence at Djerassi Resident Artist Program. Since then she has been in several residency programs like Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, Millay Colony for the Arts in New York and Valparaiso Foundation in Spain. She is a recipient of a Cultural Equity Grants by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the Academy of As an artist, my vision is to create thoughtful art projects that include the local community. I am powerfully moved by art’s capacity to transform the relationship we have with the urban environment and with ourselves.

I create large, site-specific drawings and temporary projects in dialogue with the urban landscape, fostering a real and direct interaction with the public. My whimsical installations play with existing architecture, creating intricate labyrinths that provide a pathway from the public sphere into a contemplative and spiritual realm, thus linking two very isolated worlds.

Born and raised during the democratic transition in Spain, I witnessed the subversive counterculture that flourished in a country that moved from a systemic oppression and censorship to a path of self-liberation, awakening and healing.

Growing up in an environment where national catholicism was blended with ancient pagan rituals, superstition and plant magic, inspired me to create art projects that investigate the significance of nature to human life, highlighting art’s capacity to heal the broken aspects of our society.

My site-specific installations and paintings draw audiences into unexpected and potentially liminal experiences elevating banal materials into sublime meditative landscapes that encourage contemplation, introspection and healing.