Lindsey Swedick's Brooklyn Apartment

Brooklyn, NY

As a freelance photographer working from home most days, and a general home-body, my space is unequivocally my sanctuary. As many New York City residents can attest, living in the city doesn’t usually afford you the ability to make a space your own, at least not entirely. Up until 3 years ago, I was living with a revolving door of roommates, and having to jump ship every year when rents were raised beyond what I could afford. Thus, moving every 1-2 years and sharing everything, not to mention the shoebox sizes of many of my past apartments, meant that I didn’t see much of a point in putting tons of effort in. When I moved to my current apartment in Brooklyn, it was the first time in my adult life that I had a mostly blank canvas to do whatever I wanted with. My partner and I live here alone sans roommates now (aside from our two cats!). We put in tons of work upfront, things that many renters would raise eyebrows at, like painting all the walls, repainting doors and window frames, and replacing light fixtures as a good jumping off point. From there, it’s taken many years to arrive at what I feel like is a space that fits me and feels like my home. I grew up in the Southwestern United States, in New Mexico. I still feel deeply connected to the Southwest and try to infuse elements of it into my home in subtle ways, while still keeping the overall design minimalist and modern. I look to incorporate things that remind me of home or through found objects from trips there over the years. Through my past work at West Elm and through my photography business I have also been fortunate to meet and work with a number of small designers and artists locally. I find it important to highlight meaningful objects and art that make the space truly unique and tell a story. My design taste tends to change often and it is continually evolving, but these core things remain the same and will always be important to me wherever I end up. Having small reminders scattered about of relationships I have with these makers, projects I’ve worked on with them, or things that simply make me smile is really what makes my house feel like a home.
Lindsey Swedick's Brooklyn Apartment, Homes, Interior Design
Lindsey Swedick's Brooklyn Apartment, Homes, Interior Design
+23
As a freelance photographer working from home most days, and a general home-body, my space is unequivocally my sanctuary. As many New York City residents can attest, living in the city doesn’t usually afford you the ability to make a space your own, at least not entirely. Up until 3 years ago, I was living with a revolving door of roommates, and having to jump ship every year when rents were raised beyond what I could afford. Thus, moving every 1-2 years and sharing everything, not to mention the shoebox sizes of many of my past apartments, meant that I didn’t see much of a point in putting tons of effort in. When I moved to my current apartment in Brooklyn, it was the first time in my adult life that I had a mostly blank canvas to do whatever I wanted with. My partner and I live here alone sans roommates now (aside from our two cats!). We put in tons of work upfront, things that many renters would raise eyebrows at, like painting all the walls, repainting doors and window frames, and replacing light fixtures as a good jumping off point. From there, it’s taken many years to arrive at what I feel like is a space that fits me and feels like my home. I grew up in the Southwestern United States, in New Mexico. I still feel deeply connected to the Southwest and try to infuse elements of it into my home in subtle ways, while still keeping the overall design minimalist and modern. I look to incorporate things that remind me of home or through found objects from trips there over the years. Through my past work at West Elm and through my photography business I have also been fortunate to meet and work with a number of small designers and artists locally. I find it important to highlight meaningful objects and art that make the space truly unique and tell a story. My design taste tends to change often and it is continually evolving, but these core things remain the same and will always be important to me wherever I end up. Having small reminders scattered about of relationships I have with these makers, projects I’ve worked on with them, or things that simply make me smile is really what makes my house feel like a home.

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Q&A

How does the design of your space (or an element of the design) impact the experiences people have there?

"I like to think that my space is calming to others in its minimalism and I try to put thought and care into every part of the house."
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