Art & Wall Decor by Seyed Alavi seen at Sacramento International Airport, CA, Sacramento - Flying Carpet
Art & Wall Decor by Seyed Alavi seen at Sacramento International Airport, CA, Sacramento - Flying Carpet

Flying Carpet

Seyed Alavi's "Flying Carpet" (wool and nylon carpet; 18.5' x 150') at Sacramento International Airport is an aerial view of the local river woven into a carpet for the floor of a pedestrian bridge connecting the terminal to the parking garage. This image represents approximately 50 miles of the Sacramento River starting just outside of Colusa, California and ending about 6 miles south of Chico.

In addition to recalling the experience of flight and flying, this piece, by depicting the larger geographical area, also helps to reinforce a sense of belonging and/or connection for the traveler, like a "welcome mat" for visitors arriving in Sacramento.

Meet the Creator

I approach each of my projects as an opportunity for learning, in the sense that I often seek out new contexts for research, study and discovery, instead of simply repeating what I already know/ am familiar with. Thus, I begin my aesthetic process by first welcoming and actively looking for all the eccentricities of a project.’ = Seyed Alavi

“Seyed Alavi received a Bachelor of Science degree from San Jose State University and a Masters of Fine Art from the San Francisco Art Institute. Alavi's work is often engaged with the poetics of language and space and their power to shape reality.

His public art projects include; Fountain Head in Walnut Creek, CA; Tree of Life in Seattle, WA; Room for Hope and Flying Carpet in Sacramento, CA; Tale of Time in Kochi, Japan; Seed of Knowledge in Saint Paul, MN; Nature of Life and A Sense of Unity in San Jose, CA; Signs of the Time in Emeryville, CA; Where Is Fairfield in Fairfield, CA; Words by Roads in Oakland, Selected Words in San Rafael, CA; Forgotten Language for the City of Palo Alto; Speaking Stones, Golden Gateway and What Do You Think? in San Francisco.”

Available for commission/custom work