Portrait of Georgia O'Keeffe

Public Sculptures by Marisol Escobar, in Sydney G. Walton SquareSan Francisco, CA

Public Sculptures by Marisol Escobar seen at Sydney G. Walton Square, San Francisco - Portrait of Georgia O'Keeffe
Public Sculptures by Marisol Escobar seen at Sydney G. Walton Square, San Francisco - Portrait of Georgia O'KeeffePublic Sculptures by Marisol Escobar seen at Sydney G. Walton Square, San Francisco - Portrait of Georgia O'Keeffe
Marisol Escobar created a beautiful sculpture at the Sydney G. Walton Square titled Portrait of Georgia O'Keeffe. O’Keefe sits on an old tree stump like an ancient wizard, loosely dangling her walking stick and flanked by two compact woolly dogs. It was based on photographs Marisol Escobar took while visiting the 90-year-old O’Keefe in New Mexico. Her sculpture, with her two pet show dogs, is the product of that visit.

Meet the Creator

"“Marisol, in full Marisol Escobar (1930, Paris, France—2016, New York), American sculptor of boxlike figurative works combining wood and other materials and often grouped as tableaux. She rose to fame during the 1960s and all but disappeared from art history until the 21st century.

Marisol was born in Paris of Venezuelan parents and spent her youth in Los Angeles and Paris, studying briefly at the École des Beaux-Arts (1949). In 1950 she moved to New York City, where she studied at the Art Students League and the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts. From her earliest, roughly carved figures, she worked mainly in wood.

In New York she made ties with the Abstract Expressionists—Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Jackson Pollock, among them. Though she is often associated with Pop art, she incorporated many influences into her work (folk art, pre-Columbian art, Cubism, Dadaism, collage) and thus defies classification. She gained wide recognition in the 1960s for her mixed-media figure groups; the juxtaposition of blockish inert forms and their painted, cast-plaster, or found-object features and accoutrements lend the works a deadpan irony. Many of her works depict variations of the family unit. Her portrait groups of public figures such as Charles de Gaulle and Lyndon B. Johnson (both 1967) are particularly satirical. In 1961 she was included in the Museum of Modern Art exhibition “The Art of Assemblage.” The next year and then again in 1964 she had wildly successful solo exhibitions at the Stable Gallery in New York City. During the 1960s and ’70s, Marisol was firmly situated within Andy Warhol’s social and artistic orbit; she became a close friend of his and earned roles in his films Kiss (1963) and 13 Most Beautiful Women (1964).

In the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s she continued to make portrait sculptures of artists (Georgia O’Keeffe with Dogs, 1977, and Portrait of Marcel Duchamp, 1981) and political figures (Bishop Desmond Tutu, 1988). She also began to address historical events, as in Blackfoot Delegation to Washington 1916 (1993), which makes reference to the Native American Blackfoot tribe’s attempt to negotiate with the United States government for land rights.”"

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