Created and Sold by Beverly Kedzior Fine Art

Beverly Kedzior Fine Art
Paintings by Beverly Kedzior Fine Art seen at Creator's Studio, Chicago - Quick And Tricky
+1

Quick And Tricky

$2,200

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One of a Kind item
This piece is on gallery wrap canvas and ready to hang. I started this painting by making marks and dripping paint, turning the canvas often to make the most of the drips. After several colors are laid down in this way, I use a brush and palette knife to soften and blend the colors. I continue in this way until shapes start to appear and suggest themselves to me. This is when the fun begins. I obliterate some of the images and enhance others, still turning the canvas over and over. At some point only a few strokes of paint are needed to finish it.

As always, my imagery is comes from my love of children's animatiion, cartoons and coloring books. Some of my favorites are Disney, Dr. Seuss and the Jetsons. I often turn an image from one of these sources upside down so I see only the shapes.

acrylic on canvas - 30" x 40" x 1/5" on gallery wrapped canvas - signed on the back - certificate of authenticity - ready to hang

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Beverly Kedzior Fine Art

Meet the Creator

Kedziors paintings stress color, design and texture through the use of traditional and non-traditional tools and printing techniques that include stencils, brushes, rollers, scrapers, masking and resist products.

Long before I became acquainted with the Dada and Pop visionaries, I was fascinated by the Jetsons, Disney’s animated films and Dr. Seuss’ illustrations. Saturday mornings were reserved for cartoon shows and Sunday mornings were not complete without the comic strips. My paintings reflected the biomorphic shapes contained in these venues.

Several years ago, I discovered that a genetic disorder, named Fragile X, lurked deep in my family history. In search of explanations, I was consumed with delving into medical books. The images I found there both fascinated and repelled me. At the same time, I saw a correlation to the organic and cartoony images that had become a part of my paintings. So I consciously made the medical illustrations a part of the images that I use to construct drawings that ultimately become paintings.

Although my paintings are developed with formal structure in mind and an emphasis on material and process, much of the imagery is gleaned from animated film and medical textbooks. So, as a critic once wrote, it is not an accident that some of my paintings resemble vivid, spongy and psychedelic landscapes that a space-age cartoon family might zoom through; or that others suggest Wassily Kandinsky meeting the Lava Lamp while watching a 1960’s educational film introducing youngsters to the wonders of the digestive system.

The finished paintings stress color, texture and space through the use of traditional and non-traditional tools and printing techniques that include stencils, brushes, rollers, scrapers, masking and resist products.