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Created and Sold by John T Unger

John T Unger
Compass Sculptural Firebowl | Fireplaces by John T Unger | Downriggers - Friday Harbor in Friday Harbor
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Compass Sculptural Firebowl - Fireplaces

Featured In Downriggers - Friday Harbor, Friday Harbor, WA

$1,700-$2,200

Item details

At Downriggers in Friday Harbor, WA, a Compass 37 inch Sculptural Firebowl plays a central role as a gathering place on the harbor front patio. Diners can watch boats come and go while enjoying regional Pacific NW American cuisine, innovative cocktails and gorgeous views.

When I reached out via Instagram to request some photos, Gabby told me “The fire pit is always included in our shoots because of how awesome it is!” Candles, bouquets and farm style furniture make a very inviting space for outdoor dining on the water’s edge.

The firebowl area is beautifully appointed with flowers, a sumptuous leather couch, deck chairs and baskets of blankets. A comfortable, well designed space for hanging out and taking in the views, it feels as homey as a living room. Note how the lighting both indoors and out is warm and inviting and complements the colors of the decor.

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Context & Credits

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John T Unger
Meet the Creator
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Wescover creator since 2019
John T. Unger is a sculptor and mosaic artist in Hudson, NY. Best known for his Sculptural Firebowls, Unger was the first to cut propane tanks into decorative fire features.



Self-taught as a visual artist, Unger’s training in poetry at Interlochen Arts Academy, Naropa, and Stone Circle brings a depth and lyricism to his visual works. Music, myth and metaphor are woven into his work, a foundation of story and song. Using a variety of media, he seeks to marry construction and context. Materials and techniques are chosen for their impact on narrative, meaning and nuance as much as for form or function.



To make art that will last, he looks to the past for examples that still delight after millennia— believing the simplest forms are most likely to remain relevant. Natural history, music, literature and ancient art are his strongest inspirations.



From performing his poetry on stage at Lollapalooza in 1996, to bartering a mosaic to a bank as a down payment for a house and studio, to displaying an American flag created from over 20,000 Budweiser bottle caps at the 2015 Stagecoach Music Festival, Unger’s art practice has been as much about making good stories as making good art.