Amerikalinjen

Sentrum, Norway

2 Jernbanetorget, Sentrum 0154, Norway
Amidst the growing intrigue about Norway’s increasingly dynamic capital, Oslo Amerikalinjen has opened its doors. Occupying one of the city’s most recognisable buildings, the 20th century former headquarters for the Norwegian American line, this surprisingly intimate 122-room property is layered with equal doses of subtle nostalgic references and forward-thinking design, and is defined not only by its slick rooms, but a standout offering buzzy restaurants and bars. Originally designed by prolific Norwegian architects Andreas Bjercke and George Eliassen in 1919. Now, a century later, the grand Neo-Baroque pile has been spruced up and polished by local firm Kritt Architects who, have carved out 122 rooms and suites and a series of humming public spaces that includes four restaurants and bars and Vistas. Led by the building’s original façade and wide corridors, the rooms are appropriately defined by their high ceilings and commanding paned windows, while the suites boast original ornate ceilings. The rooms have a created a sense of space by separating the bathroom with a decorative white opaque glass panel and adding a smoked-glass mirrored wall behind the bed. These details also create a modern canvas for the collection of framed maps, photographs and old dining menus from the ships – uncovered during the building process – and for the furnishings, most of which are reproductions of original mid-century classic, like Veng, an armchair designed by Torbjørn Bekken in 1960; Briger Dahl’s Birdy table lamp (1952); and pendant lamps by age-old Norwegian glassblowing company, Hadeland, who also provided the ship’s original glassware. In a first for Oslo, the ground floor and basement present a series of vibrant public spaces for guests and locals alike. With its own curb-side entrance, Atlas is an all-day brasserie that serves an eclectic blend of European favourites that have influenced New York’s culinary sceneu, while it’s grab-n-go corner offers accessible healthy options like house made soups, quinoa salads or traditional Norwegian waffles topped with a savoury twist. At the centre of the building, in a former open-air courtyard that, thanks to the addition of a glass ceiling, has smartly been transformed into a light, plant-filled indoor space is the aptly named Haven. Here, while the day away tapping on your laptop with a cup of tea or coffee and a tasty snack from the afternoon waffle trolley, or on weekends, tuck into the brunch menu. Named for the first point of entry in New York, after immigrant hopefuls got the nod from the authorities, Pier 42, with its low-slung velvet furnishings, parquet flooring and concealed lighting, is the perfect setting from which to sip on classic cocktails. The culinary journey then rounds up on a meaningful note with Gustav, an intimate basement club inspired by New York’s jazz scene and the city’s famous speakeasy bars. Named after the Norwegian America Line’s founding father, Gustav Severin Henriksen, the venue has fast become a hotspot in Oslo for its stellar parties and cosy in-the-know gigs.
2 Jernbanetorget, Sentrum 0154, Norway
Amerikalinjen, Hotels, Interior Design
Amerikalinjen, Hotels, Interior Design
Amerikalinjen, Hotels, Interior Design
+23
Amidst the growing intrigue about Norway’s increasingly dynamic capital, Oslo Amerikalinjen has opened its doors. Occupying one of the city’s most recognisable buildings, the 20th century former headquarters for the Norwegian American line, this surprisingly intimate 122-room property is layered with equal doses of subtle nostalgic references and forward-thinking design, and is defined not only by its slick rooms, but a standout offering buzzy restaurants and bars. Originally designed by prolific Norwegian architects Andreas Bjercke and George Eliassen in 1919. Now, a century later, the grand Neo-Baroque pile has been spruced up and polished by local firm Kritt Architects who, have carved out 122 rooms and suites and a series of humming public spaces that includes four restaurants and bars and Vistas. Led by the building’s original façade and wide corridors, the rooms are appropriately defined by their high ceilings and commanding paned windows, while the suites boast original ornate ceilings. The rooms have a created a sense of space by separating the bathroom with a decorative white opaque glass panel and adding a smoked-glass mirrored wall behind the bed. These details also create a modern canvas for the collection of framed maps, photographs and old dining menus from the ships – uncovered during the building process – and for the furnishings, most of which are reproductions of original mid-century classic, like Veng, an armchair designed by Torbjørn Bekken in 1960; Briger Dahl’s Birdy table lamp (1952); and pendant lamps by age-old Norwegian glassblowing company, Hadeland, who also provided the ship’s original glassware. In a first for Oslo, the ground floor and basement present a series of vibrant public spaces for guests and locals alike. With its own curb-side entrance, Atlas is an all-day brasserie that serves an eclectic blend of European favourites that have influenced New York’s culinary sceneu, while it’s grab-n-go corner offers accessible healthy options like house made soups, quinoa salads or traditional Norwegian waffles topped with a savoury twist. At the centre of the building, in a former open-air courtyard that, thanks to the addition of a glass ceiling, has smartly been transformed into a light, plant-filled indoor space is the aptly named Haven. Here, while the day away tapping on your laptop with a cup of tea or coffee and a tasty snack from the afternoon waffle trolley, or on weekends, tuck into the brunch menu. Named for the first point of entry in New York, after immigrant hopefuls got the nod from the authorities, Pier 42, with its low-slung velvet furnishings, parquet flooring and concealed lighting, is the perfect setting from which to sip on classic cocktails. The culinary journey then rounds up on a meaningful note with Gustav, an intimate basement club inspired by New York’s jazz scene and the city’s famous speakeasy bars. Named after the Norwegian America Line’s founding father, Gustav Severin Henriksen, the venue has fast become a hotspot in Oslo for its stellar parties and cosy in-the-know gigs.

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